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Agroecology pp 337-365 | Cite as

Threats to Sustainability in Intensified Agricultural Systems: Analysis and Implications for Management

  • B. R. Trenbath
  • G. R. Conway
  • I. A. Craig
Part of the Ecological Studies book series (ECOLSTUD, volume 78)

Abstract

Agricultural intensification usually consists of changes in farming practice such that: (1) a greater proportion of the available land is intensively exploited; (2) a given area is used more often; or (3) the level of technological input is raised. In many cases, these spatial, temporal, and technological aspects of intensification are combined.

Keywords

Soil Fertility Tree Biomass Pest Population Agricultural Intensification Grass Biomass 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York Inc. 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • B. R. Trenbath
  • G. R. Conway
  • I. A. Craig

There are no affiliations available

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