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Genetically Engineered Endophytes as Biocontrol Agents: A Case Study from Industry

  • Jed W. Fahey
  • Michael B. Dimock
  • Steven F. Tomasino
  • Jean M. Taylor
  • Peter S. Carlson
Part of the Brock/Springer Series in Contemporary Bioscience book series (BROCK/SPRINGER)

Abstract

Economic, social, and political forces determine which new technologies are utilized. Commercial incentives and environmental standards are the driving forces underlying the development and application of biotechnology. Agricultural biotechnology’s customer, the farmer, is a price- and risk-sensitive consumer. Inexpensive, proven technologies that demand little or no change in agronomic practices are, under ordinary conditions, preferred by farmers. Growers are reluctant to increase the portion of their costs devoted to planting materials at the beginning of the growing season. Presently, biotechnology is neither an inexpensive nor a proven method for increased crop production, and its application may alter agronomic techniques. Until proven otherwise, the case can be made that the added value created by many biotechnological manipulations may not be adequately reimbursed by the market.

Keywords

Biocontrol Agent Bacillus Thuringiensis Endophytic Bacterium Seed Inoculation Coryneform Bacterium 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York Inc. 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jed W. Fahey
  • Michael B. Dimock
  • Steven F. Tomasino
  • Jean M. Taylor
  • Peter S. Carlson

There are no affiliations available

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