The Concept of Action: A Historical Perspective

  • Louis Oppenheimer

Abstract

The emergence of the action theory perspective within European developmental psychology was the result of a growing dissatisfaction during the middle 1970s with existing theories and theoretical constructs concerning social (cognitive) and moral development. This dissatisfaction became most manifest during a number of workshops organized by the discipline of developmental psychology of the German Psychological Association (cf. Eckensberger & Meacham, 1984), followed by a number of smaller meetings and more recent symposia at the 1981 (cf. Friedman, Scholnick, & Cocking, 1987) and 1983 (see this Volume) meetings of the International Society for the Study of Behavioral development and the 1983 (Chapman, 1984) and 1987 meetings of the Society for Research in Child Development. Quite a number of arguments were brought out to justify a shift from the existing theoretical construct to a new theory and/or paradigm based on the representation of man as an active and acting organism.

Keywords

Assimilation Avant Metaphor Lewin Malleability 

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© Springer-Verlag New York, Inc. 1991

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  • Louis Oppenheimer

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