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Methods of Restoring Degraded Areas in the Great Lakes

  • John H. Hartig
  • Michael A. Zarull
Chapter
Part of the Reviews of Environmental Contamination and Toxicology book series (RECT, volume 117)

Abstract

Most, if not all ecosystems throughout the world have been contaminated, depleted or irreversibly altered. Even in our attempts to correct past exploitation, development/redevelopment is still being pursued. Therefore, there is a growing need to integrate ecosystem and social development goals. The integration of these goals, which are often seen as antithetical, demands an understanding of the interrelationships between biotic and abiotic resources and the involvement of industry, government and the public in the management of the ecosystem. Successful restoration cannot be accomplished without adequate knowledge and its effective application through institutional arrangements.

Keywords

Great Lake Conservation Tillage Conservation Reserve Program Great Lake Basin Combine Sewer Overflow 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York, Inc. 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • John H. Hartig
    • 1
  • Michael A. Zarull
    • 2
  1. 1.International Joint CommissionGreat Lakes Regional OfficeWindsorCanada
  2. 2.Lakes Research Branch, National Water Research InstituteCanada Centre for Inland WatersBurlingtonCanada

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