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The Acquisition of Cognitive Simulation Models: A Knowledge-Based Training Approach

  • Kent E. Williams
  • Richard E. Reynolds
Part of the Advances in Simulation book series (ADVS.SIMULATION, volume 4)

Abstract

The production system architecture which is common to many knowledge based systems is given considerable support for its psychological validity as demonstrated by a review of empirical research in cognitive psychology. This research supports the view that knowledge bases made up of production like organizations in human memory are acquired during the learning process. A knowledge base of these productions in human memory produce a model of a systems operation. This model has been referred to as a cognitive simulation model. By conducting a cognitive task analysis of the material to be learned, these productions can be identified along with their linkages to other productions in the model. During training then exercises can be created which explicitly describe each production which makes up this model. The result of this approach provides a method for explicitly diagnosing difficulties which an individual may have in acquiring instructional material and adaptively sequencing exercises to most efficiently and effectively build up a cognitive simulation model.

Keywords

Declarative Knowledge Instructional Content Predictive Strength Intuitive Rule Cognitive Task Analysis 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York, Inc. 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kent E. Williams
  • Richard E. Reynolds

There are no affiliations available

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