Phonological Awareness and Reading Acquisition

  • William E. Tunmer
  • Mary Rohl
Part of the Springer Series in Language and Communication book series (SSLAN, volume 28)

Abstract

A quarter century of research into one or another aspect of phonological awareness has occurred since the early work of Bruce (1964). The frequency of studies into phonological awareness seems to have increased exponentially during this period (see Ehri, 1979; Golinkoff, 1978; Nesdale, Herriman, & Tunmer, 1984; Williams, 1986, for reviews of research). In 1987, two journals, Merrill-Palmer Quarterly and Cahiers de Psychologie Cognitive, devoted entire volumes to the topic. And, of course, we now have the present volume of the Language and Communication series. There certainly is no indication that research interest in phonological awareness and its role in learning to read is subsiding.

Keywords

Tate Tempo Dial Reme Dyslexia 

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© Springer-Verlag New York Inc. 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • William E. Tunmer
  • Mary Rohl

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