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Gibberellins pp 114-124 | Cite as

Rice α-Amylase and Gibberellin Action—A Personal View

  • T. Akazawa
  • J. Yamaguchi
  • M. Hayashi
Conference paper

Abstract

An American colleague many years ago remarked to me that “you are better off not working on plant hormone and photosynthesis; if you do, you will get yourself lost in the labyrinth!”. We have not published papers dealing with the gibberellin (GA) effect on enzymatic breakdown of starch except for reporting a few negative results, but this is not necessarily because of this friend’s advice. Rather, I had some fond memories of GA research during my youthful days in America. I was a member of the class of 1950 at the University of Tokyo. Some of my classmates were engaged in the isolation and structural characterization of GAs and had a really difficult time because of the awful laboratory conditions during the postwar period. Therefore, I tremendously appreciated the advancements on GA research made in various laboratories in the United States. When I was a graduate student at the University of California—Berkeley (1956–57), I had the opportunity to attend double-header seminars given by Bernie Phinney and Anton Lang. I was truly fascinated by their remarkable discoveries concerning the effect of GAs on plant growth. Later, H. Tamiya told me that a lecture given by Y. Sumiki at the International Congress of Microbiology in Brazil was a memorable one, arousing the participants’ interests in this mysterious plant hormone hitherto unknown to scientists other than Japanese.

Keywords

Rice Seed Aleurone Layer Cereal Seed Starch Breakdown Barley Aleurone Cell 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York Inc. 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • T. Akazawa
  • J. Yamaguchi
  • M. Hayashi

There are no affiliations available

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