New Interspecific Hybrids in the Genus Medicago through In Vitro Culture of Fertilized Ovules

  • Marco Piccirilli
  • Sergio Arcioni
Conference paper

Abstract

In the genus Medicago interspecific crosses are often prevented by post-zygotic mechanisms of incompatibility, that interfere with the development of the hybrid embryos (Oldemeyer, 1956; Fridricksson and Bolton, 1963; Sandguen et al., 1983; McCoy, 1985). As a consequence, germplasm sources available for alfalfa improvement are limited to the M. sativa complex, which includes the species M. falcata, M. media and M. glutinosa, that are freely crossable with M. sativa (Lesins and Lesins, 1979). Out of this group, conventional sexual cross between M. sativa and otherMedicago species has succeeded in only a few cases (Clement, 1963; Lesins, 1961a, 1961b, 1962, 1968, 1970, 1972; Lesins and Lesins, 1979; Sandguen et al., 1982).

Keywords

Starch Glycerol Electrophoresis Proline Polyacrylamide 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York, Inc. 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • Marco Piccirilli
  • Sergio Arcioni

There are no affiliations available

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