Pollen Allergens: Molecular Cloning and Mechanism for Pollen-induced Asthma

  • Bruce Knox
  • Penelope Smith
  • Cenk Suphioglu
  • Philip Taylor
  • Asil Avjioglu
  • Piyada Theerakulpisut
  • Terryn Hough
  • Eng Ong
  • Mohan Singh

Abstract

Grass pollen is the major outdoor environmental factor provoking the immediate hypersensitive response of allergic disease in about one in five of the human population (see review by Howlett and Knox,1984). The symptoms are induced by the production of specific types of human defence molecules of the immune system, especially Immunoglubulin E (IgE). Allergens are environmental antigens which induce the formation of specific IgE, and bind specifically to IgE on the surface of epithelial mast cells. This triggers the mast cells to release the mediators of allergy.

Keywords

Starch Carbohydrate Bromide Polysaccharide Arginine 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York, Inc. 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • Bruce Knox
  • Penelope Smith
  • Cenk Suphioglu
  • Philip Taylor
  • Asil Avjioglu
  • Piyada Theerakulpisut
  • Terryn Hough
  • Eng Ong
  • Mohan Singh

There are no affiliations available

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