Ophthalmological Aspects of Epidermolysis Bullosa

  • Scott E. Brodie

Abstract

Epidermolysis bullosa (EB) is known to affect virtually every epithelial structure in the body.1 The epithelial surfaces of the eyelids, conjunctiva, and cornea are vulnerable to the disease process, producing a spectrum of ocular difficulties ranging from mild irritation and corneal abrasion to severe scarring, which may cause permanent loss of vision.2 This chapter reviews the epithelial structures of the eye, and describes the common patterns of ocular injury seen in the various major subtypes of EB. Surgical and nonsurgical therapies are also discussed.

Keywords

Pseudomonas Fluorescein Dermatol Ectropion Blepharitis 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York, Inc. 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • Scott E. Brodie

There are no affiliations available

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