The Relationship of Alcohol Drinking and Endogenous Opioids: The Opioid Compensation Hypothesis

  • B. J. Berg
  • J. R. Volpicelli
  • A. I. Alterman
  • C. P. O’Brien

Abstract

Alcohol has been used and abused by man as long as recorded history. As much as we know about how alcohol affects various organs and body systems to exert its acute and chronic effects, we are still a long way from understanding why it is that some people can drink alcohol without losing control while others cannot.

Keywords

Placebo Morphine Glucocorticoid Corticosterone Naloxone 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York, Inc. 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • B. J. Berg
  • J. R. Volpicelli
  • A. I. Alterman
  • C. P. O’Brien

There are no affiliations available

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