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Theoretical Foundations for Understanding Boundaries in Landscape Mosaics

  • Richard T. T. Forman
  • Perry N. Moore
Part of the Ecological Studies book series (ECOLSTUD, volume 92)

Abstract

Boundaries are often the most conspicuous features on land, yet our understanding of boundaries depends largely on how we perceive land. Does one focus on (1) a boundaryless pattern of gradients (analogous to certain impressionist paintings), (2) patches in a mosaic, (3) a network of corridors, or (4) boundaries or edges in a mosaic? All approaches lead to understanding of landscapes (e.g., Curtis 1959, Godron 1966, Harris 1984, Saunders et al. 1987, Merriam 1990); the last, however, leads to deeper insight into the structure and functional roles of boundaries. Wildlife biologists and ecologists have best understood this view, developing management strategies for high densities of game in edges (Leopold 1933, Giles 1978, Thomas 1979, Noss 1983).

Keywords

Landscape Ecology Forest Edge Globular Protein Landscape Element Landscape Mosaic 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York, Inc. 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • Richard T. T. Forman
  • Perry N. Moore

There are no affiliations available

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