The Environment and Development Crises as Determinants of Landscape Dynamics

  • F. di Castri
  • A. J. Hansen
Part of the Ecological Studies book series (ECOLSTUD, volume 92)

Abstract

We are living in a period of unprecedented change in the history of humankind. Never before have the ecosystems of the world and the biosphere as a whole been affected by such intense and diverse impacts. It has been 20 years since the United Nations Conference on the Human Environment held in Stockholm, from which originated, or which strongly supported, so many international efforts, such as the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP), the Tropical Forest Action Plan, the World Conservation Strategy, the Desertification Control Program, UNESCO’s Man and the Biosphere (MAB) Programme, the Regional Seas Program, and the World Climate Programme, to mention only a few of those addressing the most critical topics; nonetheless, global and most local environments have continued to proceed toward an apparently inexorable and progressive degradation. A review of international interdisciplinary research can be found in di Castri (1985) and Price (1990).

Keywords

United Nations Environment Programme World Resource Institute Introductory Chapter Landscape Boundary World Conservation Strategy 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York, Inc. 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • F. di Castri
  • A. J. Hansen

There are no affiliations available

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