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Hydrologic Budget Estimates

  • Jill Baron
  • A. Scott Denning
Part of the Ecological Studies book series (ECOLSTUD, volume 90)

Abstract

The Rocky Mountains serve as an important source of water in what is otherwise a continental, semiarid environment (Alford 1980). The mountains capture precipitation that supplies the headwaters of nearly every major river of the southwestern United States. An understanding of the hydrology of these souce regions is important to understanding regional water supplies. It is also vital to understanding the biogeochemical responses of alpine and subalpine ecosystems to acidic atmospheric deposition. Because the quantities and paths of water dictate biogeochemical processes, we derive the hydrologic budget in detail for Loch Vale Watershed (LVWS) in this chapter.

Keywords

National Atmospheric Deposition Program Rock Glacier Average Monthly Precipitation Niwot Ridge Colorado Front 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York Inc. 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jill Baron
  • A. Scott Denning

There are no affiliations available

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