Classroom-Based Literacy Instruction: The Development of One Program of Intervention Research

  • Annemarie Sullivan Palincsar
  • Yvonne Marie David
Part of the Disorders of Human Learning, Behavior, and Communication book series (HUMAN LEARNING)

Abstract

The research program that we describe in this chapter is, in many respects, a mixture of models and pragmatics. A model of learning and instruction, informed largely by theories generated in developmental and cognitive psychologies, has been applied to the pragmatics of teaching and learning in classrooms. In turn, the pragmatics of teaching and learning have served to temper this model.

Keywords

Clarification Metaphor Spiro 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Allington, R.L., & McGill-Franzen, A. (1989). School response to reading failure: Instruction for Chapter I and special education students in grades two, four, and eight. Elementary School Journal, 89 (5), 529–542.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Anderson, L.M. (1989). Implementing instructional programs to promote meaningful, self-regulated learning. In Advances in research on teaching (pp. 311–345 ). Greenwich, CT: JAI Press.Google Scholar
  3. Brown, A.L., & Palincsar, A.S. (1987). Reciprocal teaching of comprehension strategies: A natural history of one program for enhancing learning. In J. Borkowski & J.D. Day (Eds.), Intelligence and cognition in special children: Comparative studies of giftedness, mental retardation and learning disabilities (pp. 82–132 ). New York: Ablex.Google Scholar
  4. Brown, A.L. & Palincsar, A.S. (1989). Guided, cooperative learning and individual knowledge acquisition. In L.B. Resnick (Ed.), Knowing, learning, and instruction: Essays in honor of Robert Glaser. Hillsdale, NJ: Erlbaum.Google Scholar
  5. Haynes, M.C., & Jenkins, J.R. (1986). Reading instruction in special education resource rooms. American Educational Research Journal, 23, 161–190.Google Scholar
  6. Kratochwill, T.R. (1978). Single subject research: Strategies for evaluating change. New York: Academic Press.Google Scholar
  7. Palincsar, A.S. (1986). The role of dialogue in scaffolded instruction. Educational Psychologist, 21 (1 & 2), 73–98.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. Palincsar, A.S., & Brown, A.L. (1984). Reciprocal teaching of comprehension-fostering fostering and comprehension monitoring activities. Cognition and Instruction, 1 (2), 117–175.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. Palincsar, A.S., & Brown, A.L. (1989). Classroom dialogues to promote self-regulated comprehension. In J. Brophy (Ed.), Teaching for meaningful understanding and self-regulated learning, Vol. 1. Greenwich, CT: JAI Press.Google Scholar
  10. Palincsar, A.S., & Brown, A.L. (1989). Classroom dialogues to promote self-regulated comprehension. In J. Brophy (Ed.), Teaching for meaningful understanding and self-regulated learning, Vol. 1. Greenwich, CT: JAI Press.Google Scholar
  11. Palincsar, A.S., Stevens, D.D., & Gavelek, J.R. (1989). Collaborating with teachers in the interest of student collaboration. International Journal of Research in Education, 13, 41–53.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. Spiro, R.J., Bruce, B.C., & Brewer, W.F. (Eds.). (1980). Theoretical issues in reading comprehension. Hillsdale, NJ: Erlbaum.Google Scholar
  13. van Dijk, T.A. & Kintsch, W. (1983). Strategies for discourse comprehension. New York: Academic Press.Google Scholar
  14. Wells, G., Chang, G.L., & Maher, A. (in press). Creating classroom communities of literate thinkers. In S. Sharan (Ed.), Cooperative learning: Theory and research. New York: Praeger.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York Inc. 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • Annemarie Sullivan Palincsar
  • Yvonne Marie David

There are no affiliations available

Personalised recommendations