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From Self-Navigation to Driver’s Associate: An Application of Mobile Robot Vision to a Vehicle Information System

  • Kohji Kamejima
  • Tomoyuki Hamada
  • Masahiro Tsuchiya
  • Yuriko C. Watanabe
Part of the Springer Series in Perception Engineering book series (SSPERCEPTION)

Abstract

The concept of a vehicle information system, called the driver’s associate, is presented for identifying a driving environment in cooperation with human drivers. Sharing the image feature extracted and segmented in observed imagery, a set of frustration resolution schemes for top-down processing and 2-D syntax analysis for bottom-up processing are integrated into a dynamic perception mechanism that is implemented by a set of LSIs (Large Scale Integration chips). The schematics of the software are verified through simulation studies to demonstrate the basic operation scenario of the driver’s associate.

Keywords

Mobile Robot Transportation Process Human Driver Terminal Symbol Image Feature Extraction 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York, Inc. 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kohji Kamejima
  • Tomoyuki Hamada
  • Masahiro Tsuchiya
  • Yuriko C. Watanabe

There are no affiliations available

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