Modulation of Neuronal Information Transmission

  • Hinrich Rahmann
  • Mathilde Rahmann

Abstract

In light of the myriad details presented thus far relative to the molecular structure of the synaptic membrane, the vesicles, the synaptic transmitters (neurotransmitters, neuropeptides), and their neuroreceptors, one might well conclude that the relatively strict sequencing of events in the transmission process of electrical information signals from one neuron to the next requires that the component processes be modulated in order to attain transmission. Of course, a neuronal impulse triggers the release of transmitter substances. Nonetheless, the quantity of the released substance as well as the strength, duration, and modality of the postsynaptic effects (inhibitory or excitatory) must be coordinated precisely.

Keywords

Cholesterol Permeability Magnesium Mercury Cobalt 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York Inc. 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • Hinrich Rahmann
    • 1
  • Mathilde Rahmann
    • 1
  1. 1.Zoologisches InstitutUniversität Stuttgart-HohenheimStuttgartGermany

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