Understanding Human Nature: A Post-Foundationalist Psychology

  • Leendert P. Mos
  • Casey P. Boodt
Conference paper
Part of the Recent Research in Psychology book series (PSYCHOLOGY)

Summary

A critical overview of the pragmatical and hermeneutical roots of a post-foundationalist philosophy with particular focus on its implications for psychology. It is argued that the pragmatic turn in post-positivist anti-foundationalism fails to understand that our individual and collective practices are normatively grounded in a hermeneutics of social and historical traditions.

Keywords

Coherence Stam 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York, Inc. 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • Leendert P. Mos
  • Casey P. Boodt

There are no affiliations available

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