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Psychoacoustics

  • Glenis R. Long
Part of the Springer Handbook of Auditory Research book series (SHAR, volume 4)

Abstract

While there are now large bodies of research in both human psychoacoustics (reviewed in Vol 3 of this series) and nonhuman mammalian auditory physiology and anatomy (reviewed in Vols 1 and 2), the understanding of mammalian hearing has been handicapped by a failure to integrate these two areas of research. Many human psychoacoustic papers attempt to account for, and model, human psychophysical performance based on some convenient selection of nonhuman mammalian anatomical and physiological measures of hearing, without determining whether the animals perceive sounds in the same way as the human subjects. Although the mammalian auditory system has several components in common across species, there can be extreme differences when the auditory system is modified due to an animal’s specialized use of sound (see Echteler, Chapter 5). For example, the cochlea of the greater horseshoe bat (Rhinolophus ferrumequinum) departs significantly from that of other species (reviewed in Pollak and Casseday 1989), and estimates of frequency resolution (Long 1977, 1980a,b) and frequency discrimination (Heilmann-Rudolf 1984) from this species reflect these differences. These specializations are related to the use of sound for echolocation. Humans also use sounds in a very sophisticated way in speech perception, and it is probable that the human auditory system is also specialized (especially in the frequency region associated with speech).

Keywords

Frequency Resolution Tuning Curve Otoacoustic Emission Frequency Discrimination Critical Band 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Springer-Verlag New York, Inc. 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • Glenis R. Long

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