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Trees: Growth

  • Bjørn Tveite
  • Gunnar Abrahamsen
  • Magne Huse
Part of the Ecological Studies book series (ECOLSTUD, volume 104)

Abstract

A number of climatic and edaphic factors determine forest growth and vigor. The effects of different factors are generally known, but detailed knowledge about how different factors interact under different site conditions is not generally available. Long-term field experiments represent a valuable scientific approach when the effects of certain factors on forests (e.g. acid rain) are to be studied. Such experiments are especially valuable when it is important to study the effects under natural conditions in which the forest is influenced by a number of other environmental factors.

Keywords

Basal Area Height Growth Volume Growth Acid Loading Basal Area Growth 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York, Inc. 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • Bjørn Tveite
    • 1
  • Gunnar Abrahamsen
    • 2
  • Magne Huse
    • 3
  1. 1.Norwegian Forest Research InstituteÅsNorway
  2. 2.Department of Soil and Water SciencesAgricultural University of NorwayÅsNorway
  3. 3.Norwegian Forest Research InstituteÅsNorway

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