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Soil Chemistry

  • Arne O. Stuanes
  • Gunnar Abrahamsen
Part of the Ecological Studies book series (ECOLSTUD, volume 104)

Abstract

Soil samples from the forest floor (O) or the Ah horizon, the bleach horizon (E), and two depths in the Bs horizon (Bs1 and Bs2) were collected from the experimental plots in the following years:
  • A-1: 1974, 1975, 1978, 1984, 1988;

  • A-2: 1975, 1978, 1981, 1984, 1988;

  • A-3: 1974, 1978, 1981, 1984, 1988;

  • B-1: 1975, 1978, 1981, 1984, 1988;

  • B-2: 1978, 1984, 1988.

Keywords

Soil Organic Matter Cation Exchange Capacity Forest Floor Base Saturation Acid Load 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York, Inc. 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • Arne O. Stuanes
    • 1
  • Gunnar Abrahamsen
    • 2
  1. 1.Norwegian Forest Research InstituteÅsNorway
  2. 2.Department of Soil and Water SciencesAgricultural University of NorwayÅsNorway

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