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Monolith Lysimeters

  • Gunnar Abrahamsen
  • Arne O. Stuanes
  • Trine A. Sogn
Part of the Ecological Studies book series (ECOLSTUD, volume 104)

Abstract

As mentioned in Chapters 2 and 3, the first lysimeter studies (series 1 and 2) were designed to examine leaching from the soil of the field experiments A-1 and A-3. The treatments in these two lysimeter experiments correspond to most of the treatments in the field experiments (Tables 3.1 and 3.2). Similar to the method used in the field experiments, the artificial rain applied to the lysime ters was produced from groundwater to which different quantities of sulfuric acid was added. Compared to natural rain, artificial rain produced from groundwater usually has higher concentrations of Na, K, Ca, Mg, Mn, Fe, Al, SO4, and Cl ions, and lower concentrations of NO3 and NH4 ions. Different concentrations of ions in the artificial rain influence ion exchange reactions in the soil, and may thus give unrealistic leaching data. To examine this problem, two other lysimeter studies (Series 3 and 4) were established to, among other aims, determine the effect of the same fluxes of different ions at different concentrations (Table 3.2). These lysimeter series were carried out with different soil types (Table 2.3).

Keywords

Drainage Water Base Cation Acid Precipitation Mobilization Rate Natural Precipitation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York, Inc. 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • Gunnar Abrahamsen
    • 1
  • Arne O. Stuanes
    • 2
  • Trine A. Sogn
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of Soil and Water SciencesAgricultural University of NorwayÅsNorway
  2. 2.Norwegian Forest Research InstituteÅsNorway
  3. 3.Department of Soil and Water SciencesAgricultural University of NorwayÅsNorway

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