Adhesion Molecules in Renal Cell Carcinoma

  • Frank Steinbach
  • Kazunari Tanabe
  • Jeannine Alexander
  • Eric A. Klein
Conference paper

Abstract

Cell adhesion molecules (CAM) are cell surface molecules which define the temporal, spatial, and cellular selectivity patterns of cell-cell interactions. During ontogenesis, cell adhesion molecules provide tissue- and organ specific information and serve as contact molecules in the arrangement of complex tissues. In mature tissue CAM are important for the antigen-specific and non-specific immune response, mediating the extravasation of lymphocytes into perivascular tissue and the interaction between lymphocytes and other cells such as antigen presenting cells. (1)

Keywords

Migration Carbohydrate Leukemia Integrin Neuroblastoma 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York Inc. 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • Frank Steinbach
    • 1
  • Kazunari Tanabe
    • 1
  • Jeannine Alexander
    • 1
  • Eric A. Klein
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Urology, Section of Urologie OncologyThe Cleveland Clinic FoundationClevelandUSA

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