Swedish Pesticide Policies 1972–93: Risk Reduction and Environmental Charges

  • George Ekström
  • Vibeke Bernson
Part of the Reviews of Environmental Contamination and Toxicology book series (RECT, volume 141)

Abstract

Recent decisions by the Swedish parliament and government to reduce the use of agricultural pesticides by 75% over 10 years have received interna­tional attention. Steps taken to reduce the risks connected with the use of nonagricultural pesticides, which constitute the majority of pesticides used in Sweden, have not attracted the same attention. The Swedish Ordinance on Pesticides defines the term “pesticide” as “a chemical product that is intended for use to protect against damage to property, sanitary nuisances, or other comparable nuisances caused by plants, animals, or microorgan­isms.” The ordinance covers not only agricultural pesticides but also wood preservatives used by industry. Of 8914 metric tons of pesticide active ingre­dients (a.i.s) sold in 1993, 4856 tons (54%) consisted of creosote, a wood preservative used by industry. Industrially used chromium compounds make the second largest cntribution to the overall consumption of pesticides in Sweden.

Keywords

Thallium Paraquat Dichromate Copper Sulfate Malathion 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York, Inc. 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • George Ekström
    • 1
  • Vibeke Bernson
    • 1
  1. 1.The National Chemicals InspectorateSolnaSweden

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