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Partnerships for Wildlife Restoration: Peregrine Falcons

  • Chris G. Blomme
  • Karen M. Laws
Part of the Springer Series on Environmental Management book series (SSEM)

Abstract

Conservation agencies throughout the world are working to protect and restore endangered spe­cies of wildlife. Some of the better known resto­ration programs are those involving species such as the whooping crane (Grus americana) and California condor (Gymnogyps californianus),but there are also many less publicized efforts in aid of a wide variety of species. Unfortunately, many of these restoration programs, especially those involving species that have reached criti­cally low numbers, prove to be extremely difficult and often unsuccessful (Halliday 1978; Griffith et al. 1989). However, the need for these programs continues to rise under increasing pressure of habitat loss, overexploitation, introduction of ex­otic species, and environmental pollution.

Keywords

Peregrine Falcon Canadian Wildlife Whooping Crane Urban Release Student Residence 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York Inc. 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • Chris G. Blomme
  • Karen M. Laws

There are no affiliations available

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