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Hydrogeologic Setting

  • Mary Gail Perkins
  • Edwin A. Romanowicz
Part of the Springer Series on Environmental Management book series (SSEM)

Abstract

This chapter provides a review of available information pertaining to the geology and hydrogeology of Onondaga Lake and its tributaries. New information related to the hydrogeochemistry of both Ninemile Creek and Onondaga Creek, along with an overall interpretation of the general flow system surrounding Onondaga Lake, are also presented. The chemistry of tributary inflows into Onondaga Lake, and the chemistry of Onondaga Lake itself, is directly affected by the geologic setting. Concentrated urban and industrial development in areas which may be in hydrologic connection to the lake and its main tributaries suggests that groundwater in selected areas requires careful evaluation as a potential medium of contaminant transport.

Keywords

Hydraulic Conductivity Hydraulic Head Hydrogeologic Setting Total Volatile Organic Compound Hydrostratigraphic Unit 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York, Inc 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • Mary Gail Perkins
  • Edwin A. Romanowicz

There are no affiliations available

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