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Cell Journeys: Even Germ Cells and Cells of the Peripheral Nervous System Originate from Emigrant Precursors

  • Werner A. Müller

Abstract

Animal embryos, especially those of vertebrates, are like cities full of tourists. In a translucent fish embryo migratory cells can be seen crawling and swarming (Fig. 3–38). In an avian and a mammalian blastodisc the cells of the meso “derm” do not form a “skin” (Greek: derma = skin) or a coherent germ “layer”; instead, the mesodermal cells creep around like amoebae to colonize the spaces between the epiblast and the hypoblast (Fig. 3–39, 3–48). When the somites split up, the cells of the sclerotome and the dermatome emigrate (Fig. 3–32, 9–5). Primordial germ cells, blood cells, and neural crest cells travel particularly long distances.

Keywords

Germ Cell Neural Crest Neural Crest Cell Myenteric Plexus Primordial Germ Cell 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York, Inc. 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • Werner A. Müller
    • 1
  1. 1.Zoologisches Institut—PhysiologieUniversity of HeidelbergHeidelbergGermany

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