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Interactions of Elevated Carbon Dioxide, Nutrient Status, and Water Stress on Physiological Processes and Competitive Interactions Among Three Forest Tree Species

  • John W. Groninger
  • John R. Seiler
  • Alexander L. Friend
  • Paul C. Berrang
  • Shepard M. Zedaker
Part of the Ecological Studies book series (ECOLSTUD, volume 128)

Abstract

Loblolly pine-hardwood forest systems cover vast areas throughout the southern United States, and contribute profoundly to the economic and ecological stability of the region. Concern has been voiced that increased atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations could ultimately produce changes in forest composition or increase the cost associated with maintaining forests of desired species composition. In 1994, forest landowners in the South incurred site-preparation and crop- release costs in excess of $50 million to establish and maintain desired stand composition (Dubois et al., 1995). Forest managers, and corporate and regional planners would benefit from understanding the nature of these potential changes in forest composition in order to adjust silvicultural strategies, cost, and resource flow expectations for these forests during the next century.

Keywords

Water Stress Mixed Stand Root Length Density Photosynthetic Acclimation Elevated Carbon Dioxide 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York, Inc. 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • John W. Groninger
  • John R. Seiler
  • Alexander L. Friend
  • Paul C. Berrang
  • Shepard M. Zedaker

There are no affiliations available

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