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Modeling the Differential Sensitivity of Loblolly Pine to Climatic Change Using Tree Rings

  • Edward R. Cook
  • Warren L. Nance
  • Paul J. Krusic
  • James Grissom
Part of the Ecological Studies book series (ECOLSTUD, volume 128)

Abstract

The Southwide Pine Seed Source Study (SPSSS) was undertaken in 1951 to determine to what extent inherent geographic variation in four southern pine species (loblolly pine, Pinus taeda L.; slash pine, P. elliottii Engelm. var. elliottii; longleaf pine, P. palustris Mill.; and shortleaf pine, P. echinata Mill.) is related to observable geographic variation in climate and physiography. The study’s design was based on the classic common garden test design wherein all geographic sources were planted together at multiple sites across the natural range; and the fundamental objective was to test the widely accepted hypothesis that local seed sources were uniformly better adapted and faster growing than nonlocal seed sources from the same species (complete study details appear in Wells and Wakeley, 1966).

Keywords

Tree Ring Radial Growth Seed Source Differential Sensitivity Climate Index 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York, Inc. 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • Edward R. Cook
  • Warren L. Nance
  • Paul J. Krusic
  • James Grissom

There are no affiliations available

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