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Breast Care pp 52-68 | Cite as

Screening Mammography

  • Eric L. Rosen
  • Steven D. Frankel
  • Edward A. Sickles

Abstract

The combination of mammography and clinical breast examination (CBE), performed at standard intervals, is currently the best way to provide breast cancer screening. Mammography employs x-rays to image the breast and requires specialized equipment, highly trained technologists, and specially trained physicians (almost always radiologists) to interpret the images. Mammography can be utilized either to detect unsuspected breast abnormalities (screening) or to evaluate known abnormalities (diagnosis). These two functions are most often performed separately because it allows screening examinations to be done in a more streamlined fashion and hence more rapidly and at lower cost.

Keywords

Clinical Breast Examination Architectural Distortion Screening Mammogram Screen Mammogram Benign Mass 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Recommended Reading

  1. Sickles EA. Breast calcifications: mammographie evaluation. Radiology 1986;160:289–293PubMedGoogle Scholar
  2. Sickles EA. Periodic mammographie follow-up of probably benign lesions: results in 3184 consecutive cases. Radiology 1991;179:462–468Google Scholar
  3. Sickles EA, Kopans DB. Mammographie screening for women aged 40 to 49 years: the primary care practitioner’s dilemma. Ann Intern Med 1995;122:534–538PubMedGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York Inc. 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • Eric L. Rosen
  • Steven D. Frankel
  • Edward A. Sickles

There are no affiliations available

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