Ionic Versus Nonionic Contrast Material

  • Ronald L. Eisenberg

Abstract

Currently, there are two major categories of iodinated contrast agents—high and low osmolar. With high-osmolar (“ionic”) contrast there is a small, but well-recognized, risk of adverse reactions, some of which are life threatening. However, the vast majority of patients receiving highosmolar contrast do not experience any significant side effects. Lowosmolar (“non-ionic”) contrast has a substantially lower rate of serious reactions (though not fatalities), but is considerably more expensive even in view of a significant decrease in price over the past few years.1

Keywords

Catheter Expense Flushing 

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Endnotes

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    Smith JJ. Intravenous contrast agents: adverse reactions. In: Risk Management. Test and Syllabus. Reston, VA: American College of Radiology, 1999: 75–97.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York, Inc. 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ronald L. Eisenberg
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of RadiologyAlameda County Medical CenterOaklandUSA
  2. 2.University of California School of Medicine at San Francisco and DavisUSA

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