Patch Dynamics: The Transformation of Landscape Structure and Function

  • S. T. A. Pickett
  • Kevin H. Rogers

Abstract

One of the most important developments in modern ecology is the recognition that heterogeneity, or spatial pattern, is a key part of the structure and functioning of nature. No person working to understand the natural world or to manage natural resources can afford to neglect the fact that habitats, physical environments, resources, organisms, and other ecological objects have a complex spatial diversity (Bell et al. 1991 Caldwell and Pearcy 1994). However, ecologists and wildlife biologists have recognized spatial heterogeneity primarily at coarser scales. Coarse scale heterogeneity appears in such patterns as elevational gradients of plant and animal distribution, the contrast between different climatic zones with latitude, and contrasts between such community types as bogs and uplands, grassland, and forest (McIntosh 1991).

Keywords

Migration Phosphorus Depression Transportation Beach 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • S. T. A. Pickett
  • Kevin H. Rogers

There are no affiliations available

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