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Estimating Risk and Prognosis

  • S. A. Marion
  • M. T. Schechter

Abstract

An understanding of the natural history of treated and untreated disease is essential to the physician, is an area of utmost concern to patients, and is the basis of most decisions about management. The clinician faces numerous questions about the risk of certain events and the natural history of various disease states. Given a patient of a certain age and sex, what is the probability that symptomatic coronary heart disease will develop in the next 5 years? Given such a patient, together with the results of certain diagnostic maneuvers, what is the probability that significant coronary heart disease is already present? Given a set of characteristics of a coronary bypass surgery candidate, what is the probability that he or she will survive at least 5 years after surgery?.

Keywords

Deep Vein Thrombosis Critical Event Cumulative Probability Untreated Group Cumulative Risk 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • S. A. Marion
  • M. T. Schechter

There are no affiliations available

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