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Biomag 96 pp 1098-1101 | Cite as

Intracortical Spread of Epileptic Spikes — Simultaneous Measurement of Magnetic Field and Electric Potential in Rabbits

  • M. Eiselt
  • U. Zwiener
  • F. Gießler
  • H. Wagner
  • J. Haueisen
  • R. Huonker
  • H. Nowak
  • B. Schack
Conference paper

Abstract

In many experiments we observed differences between simultaneously measured ECoG and MEG signals concerning the temporal relationship of characteristic features like maxima or minima. This was not surprising despite MEG and extracellular electric potential are functionally related. They are caused by different bioelectric processes. The MEG is mainly caused by intracellular currents of neuronal cell populations. The extracellular electric potential is caused by currents through the cellular membrane. These currents can be elucidated by current source density analysis (CSD).

Keywords

Cortical Surface Positive Maximum Current Dipole Current Source Density Magnetic Field Maximum 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2000

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. Eiselt
    • 1
  • U. Zwiener
    • 1
  • F. Gießler
    • 2
  • H. Wagner
    • 1
  • J. Haueisen
    • 2
  • R. Huonker
    • 2
  • H. Nowak
    • 2
  • B. Schack
    • 3
  1. 1.Inst. PathophysiologyClinic of the Friedrich Schiller UniversityJenaGermany
  2. 2.Biomagnetic CentreClinic of the Friedrich Schiller UniversityJenaGermany
  3. 3.Inst. of Medical Statistics, Informatics and DocumentationClinic of the Friedrich Schiller UniversityJenaGermany

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