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Biomag 96 pp 856-859 | Cite as

MEG Measurement of Auditory Sensory Memory Persistence via the M100 in Children and Adults

  • D. C. Rojas
  • J. L. Sheeder
  • P. Teale
  • J. R. Walker
  • B. A. Robertson
  • S. Selig
  • M. Reite

Abstract

There have been several papers linking the auditory evoked field (AEF) component M100 to the auditory sensory memory trace, or echoic memory [1,2,3]. Recently, a preliminary effort to describe the AEF in children has been reported [4]. It is apparent that children do not show the same component structure as adults when presented with the same stimuli. The most striking finding of this report was the apparent lack of M100 response in the younger children, a finding which we have also replicated (see below). One possible explanation, proposed by Paetau, et al. [4], is that the M100 refractory period is longer in children than adults. Thus, the field strength of the M100 would be much weaker than adults at similar interstimulus intervals. Also, if the refractory period is longer in children than adults, then the echoic memory trace duration would also be longer, assuming that M100 indexes the trace duration, as proposed by Lü, et al. [1]. As this possibility is theoretically important to both psychology and MEG research, two experiments were undertaken in children and adults to explore the development of the AEF M100 component.

Keywords

Refractory Period Dipolar Component Auricular Point Salary Support Echoic Memory 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

  1. [1]
    Lü, Z.-L., Williamson, S. J., and Kaufman, L. Science, 1992, 258: 1668–1670.ADSCrossRefGoogle Scholar
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    Lü, Z.-L., Williamson, S. J., and Kaufman, L. Brain Research, 1992, 572: 236–241.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. [3]
    Sams, M., Hari, R., Rif, J., and Knuutila, J. Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience, 1993, 5: 363–370.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. [4]
    Paetau, R., Ahonen, A., Salonen, O., and Sams, M. Journal of Clinical Neurophysiology, 1995, 12: 177–185.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. [5]
    Reite, M., Adams, M., Simon, J., Teale, P., Sheeder, J., Richardson, D. and Grabbe, R. Cognitive Brain Research, 1994,2: 13–20.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2000

Authors and Affiliations

  • D. C. Rojas
    • 1
  • J. L. Sheeder
    • 1
  • P. Teale
    • 1
  • J. R. Walker
    • 1
  • B. A. Robertson
    • 1
  • S. Selig
    • 1
  • M. Reite
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.University of Colorado Health Sciences CenterDenverUSA
  2. 2.Veterans Administration Medical CenterDenverUSA

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