Biomag 96 pp 777-780 | Cite as

Neuromagnetic Correlates of Endogenous Auditory Sensations

  • E. S. Hoke
  • M. Hoke
  • B. Ross
Conference paper

Abstract

Endogenous auditory sensations occur without simultaneous reception of an external acoustic stimulus. They can occur under physiological conditions, but can also be associated with pathological processes. A commonly known sensation of the second kind is tinnitus, or ringing in the ear, a frequent symptom which is often associated with several hearing disorders. A sensation of the first kind is the auditory afterimage. Contrary to the vision system in which after-images have been known for a long time, auditory stimulation was, in general, not assumed to lead to clear-cut after-effects. An exception is the exposure to acoustic overstimulation which has been known to lead to a temporary threshold shift which is sometimes accompanied by an auditory sensation, tinnitus.

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2000

Authors and Affiliations

  • E. S. Hoke
    • 1
  • M. Hoke
    • 1
  • B. Ross
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute of Experimental AudiologyUniversity of MünsterMünsterGermany

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