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Biomag 96 pp 737-740 | Cite as

Auditory Evoked Magnetic Fields After Stimulation with Test-Tones and Words — Studies on Experimentees with Good Hearing and with Long-Term Hearing Impediments

  • E. Emmerich
  • R. Meyer
  • H. Nowak
  • R. Huonker
  • F. Gießler
  • W. Meißner
  • E. Beleites
Conference paper

Abstract

The aim of the present study was to evaluate results of the distorted central auditory process. Localization of human cortical responses to acoustical stimulation with tones and speech signals began with magnetoencephalographic (MEG) studies on primary auditory cortex performed by R. HARI and her working group [1],[2]. The MEG studies in connection with MRT-picture have demonstrated that the sources of the magnetic fields (peak-latencies 100 ms) are in the primary auditory cortex.

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References

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    HARI, R. “The Neuromagnetic Method in the Study of the Human Auditory Cortex“ in F. Grandori, M. Hoke and G.L. Romani (Eds.), Auditory evoked magnetic Fields and Potentials Advances in Audiology, Vol.6, Karger, Basel, 222–282, 1990Google Scholar
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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2000

Authors and Affiliations

  • E. Emmerich
    • 2
  • R. Meyer
    • 1
  • H. Nowak
    • 3
  • R. Huonker
    • 3
  • F. Gießler
    • 3
  • W. Meißner
    • 1
  • E. Beleites
    • 1
  1. 1.Clinical Department of AudiologyFriedrich-Schiller-UniversityJenaGermany
  2. 2.Institute of Physiology IFriedrich-Schiller-UniversityJenaGermany
  3. 3.Biomagnetic CenterFriedrich-Schiller-UniversityJenaGermany

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