In Search of Impulse Sound Sources in Odontocetes

  • Ted W. Cranford
Part of the Springer Handbook of Auditory Research book series (SHAR, volume 12)

Abstract

Naturalists have been aware of the sounds produced by toothed whales, odontocetes, since the time of the ancient Greeks. The first recordings of odontocete sounds were published in 1949, when Schevill and Lawrence used a Dictaphone machine to record sounds from the white whale, Del-phinapterus leucas. These “sea canaries” generated a rich variety of sounds that were reproduced on two phonograph records (Schevill and Lawrence 1950; Schevill and Watkins 1962). The recordings sparked the curiosity of investigators, who raised questions about the source and function of these sounds. Since that time, researchers have engaged in attempts to determine the exact mechanism and specific location for the production of odontocete echolocation pulses, as well as their formation into a forward-projecting sonar beam.

Keywords

Cavitation Bark Parkin Acoustics Melon 

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© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2000

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  • Ted W. Cranford

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