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Influence of Shock-Wave Deformation on the Structure/Property Behavior of Materials

  • G. T. GrayIII
Part of the High-Pressure Shock Compression of Condensed Matter book series (SHOCKWAVE)

Abstract

While the field of shock-wave physics has provided significant insights into many of the processes related to wave propagation in materials, the exact micromechanisms of deformation during shock loading remain poorly understood. The initial response of a material subjected to explosive or high-velocity impact conditions is to propagate shock waves that rapidly traverse the material. These waves produce dynamic deformations, the extent of strain is dependent on the precise method of loading and the degree to which a hydrostatic stress state is maintained. If we are to develop an understanding of the total response of a material to impact, we must investigate the specific influence of shock waves on microstructure and the corresponding effects on mechanical properties. The severe loading path conditions imposed during a shock induce a high density of defects in most materials, i.e., dislocations, point defects, and/or deformation twins. In addition, during the shock process some materials may undergo a pressure-induced phase transition which will affect the real-time material response. If the phase remains present to ambient conditions (although metastable) the post-mortem substructure and mechanical response will also reflect the high-pressure excursion. Interpretation of the results of shock-wave effects on materials must therefore address all of the details of the shock-induced deformation substructure in light of the operative metallurgical strengthening mechanisms in the material under investigation, and the experimental conditions under which the material was deformed and recovered.

Keywords

Shock Loading Bauschinger Effect Shock Process Hugoniot Elastic Limit Driver Plate 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York  1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • G. T. GrayIII
    • 1
  1. 1.Materials Research and Processing Science, Materials Science and Technology DivisionLos Alamos National LaboratoryLos AlamosUSA

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