Waterfowl and Wetland Ecology in Alaska

  • James S. Sedinger
Part of the Ecological Studies book series (ECOLSTUD, volume 119)

Abstract

Alaska’s waterfowl are receiving more attention as they become an increasingly important component of North American continental populations. Continental populations of ducks are at record low levels (Bortner et al., 1991), largely because of loss of habitat in midcontinent breeding areas (Tiner, 1984) and drought conditions through much of the 1980s (Bortner et al., 1991). Because breeding populations in Alaska have remained stable, or even increased, a larger proportion of continental duck populations are currently recorded in Alaska during breeding pair surveys than ever before (Conant and Dau, 1991). For example, >50% of breeding Northern Pintails (Anas acuta) in North America have been recorded in Alaska each year since 1987 (Conant and Dau, 1991). Alaska also contains >90% of the world’s Trumpeter Swans (Cygnus buccinator), which are classified as endangered in the contiguous 48 states. Many other breeding populations of waterfowl achieve their highest concentrations in Alaska.

Keywords

Biomass Migration Phosphorus Chlorophyll Carbohydrate 

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  • James S. Sedinger

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