Determination of Physical Structure and Modeling

  • Frederick H. Silver
  • David L. Christiansen

Abstract

Much of our understanding of the way cells and tissues behave reflects to a first approximation the behavior of isolated single macromolecules. For example, the resistance of tendon to deformation reflects the high axial ratio of the collagen molecule and the packing of these molecules into parallel arrays in collagen fibrils and fibers. Although much information is gained from studying molecular structure by X-ray diffraction, from which the average atomic coordinates of molecules in a crystal can be determined, other information is needed to get an exact picture of the molecular structure.

Keywords

Sugar Sucrose Corn Albumin Polysaccharide 

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Suggested Reading

  1. Birk D.E. and Silver F.H., Corneal and Scleral Type I Collagens: Analyses of Physical Properties and Molecular Flexibility, Int. J. Biol. Macromol. 5, 209, 1983.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Silver F.H. and Trelstad R.L., Type I Collagen Structure in Solution and Properties of Fibril Fragments, J. Biol. Chem. 255, 9427, 1980.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  3. Silver F.H., Biological Materials: Structure, Mechanical Properties, and Modeling of Soft Tissues, NYU Press, New York, chapter 4, 1987.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • Frederick H. Silver
    • 1
  • David L. Christiansen
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PathologyUMDNJ—Robert Wood Johnson Medical SchoolPiscatawayUSA

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