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Chest Wall Tumours

  • Maninder Singh Kalkat
Chapter

Abstract

The most common indications for chest wall resection include tumours (primary, invasive lung, thymic or breast cancers and metastasis), radiation induced necrosis and trauma. The resection results in large defects in the chest wall, exposes the vital structures and interferes with the respiratory mechanics. The reconstruction of the chest wall defects with appropriate techniques is essential to restore the structural and functional integrity of the chest wall. In addition, the reconstruction is important to achieve good cosmetic outcome.

Keywords

Chest wall tumours Chest wall resection Reconstruction Chest wall stabilization Sarcomas Prosthesis Methyl methacrylate Soft tissue flaps 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag London Ltd., part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Maninder Singh Kalkat
    • 1
  1. 1.Regional Department of Thoracic SurgeryBirmingham Heartlands HospitalBirminghamUK

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