Art, Creativity, and Culture: How Art Intersects with Science in the Expression of Artistic Creativity

Chapter

Abstract

Almost a half century ago, Snow (The two cultures and the scientific revolution. Cambridge University Press, New York, 1959) identified a problem that still needs discussion. Snow felt that he was living in two distinct separate cultures that ceased to communicate among each other. The two cultures would use distinct terminology and have a lack of understanding of each other. Snow felt that although these cultures were discrete, yet he felt commonalities between the two. One commonality was that he was a part of both cultures. Previous studies (Charyton in Creativity (Scientific, artistic, general) and risk tolerance among engineering and music students, Temple University, 2005, Charyton in Creativity (scientific, artistic, and general) and risk tolerance among engineering and music students. VDM Verlag Publishing, Germany, 2008; Charyton and Snelbecker in Creativity Res 19:213–225, 2007a, Charyton and Snelbecker in Psychol Aesthetics Creativity Arts 1:91–99, 2007b) addressed specific domains of creativity in both science and art as well as the intersection of both science and art. Discussion about personality characteristics of scientists and artists are discussed along with case studies. Case studies are discussed for the cultural intersections of the East (Asia) and West (Europe) with science and art. The Ukrainian culture is also discussed as a culture unifying the East and the West as a bridge where eminent Ukrainian persons may more often excel in more than one discipline as polymaths. Recent political concerns in Ukraine are described in relation to creativity, innovation, and culture as well as exceptionality in both the sciences and the arts as polymaths as an occurring aspect of the Ukrainian culture.

Keywords

Art Science Polymath Ukraine Culture Creativity Innovation Personal attributes Scientists Artists 

Notes

Acknowledgments

I would like to express special gratitude to Anthony Doyle, Ostap Szwabinsky, Mykola Shynkaryk, Hania Essenhigh, and Marianna Klochko for editorial feedback and attention to detail and sincere gratitude to Myroslava Mudrak for introducing me to the work of Archipenko, Alex Charyton, Alexander Rakowsky, Lesya Rakowsky, and Arka Melnyk for their input regarding characteristics and experiences of the Ukrainian culture and confirming what I have witnessed growing up in the Ukrainian culture. I am grateful to Victor Borsukevich for translating educational materials from Ukrainian to English, Mykola Shynkaryk for translating Ukrainian text and e-mails into English, and Father Bob Stash for conversations about the spiritual meaning of the Tryzub and advice for obtaining translations and visiting Ukraine. I am grateful to Andriy Fedynsky, Marko Tarnawsky, Ivan Kulak, and Iryna Kurylec for resources and library support at Ukrainian Educational Centers. I am grateful to Ukrainska Biblioteka and the Ukrainian Educational and Cultural Center, 700 Cedar Road, Jenkintown, Pennsylvania, 19046, and Ukrainian Museum-Archives, 1202 Kenilworth Avenue, Cleveland, Ohio, 44113. I am very grateful to Arka Melnyk, Mariyka Szwabinsky, and Hania Essenhigh for resources and perspectives as well as the Ukrainian Cultural Association of Ohio and United Ukrainian Organizations of Ohio for cosponsoring local Ukrainian events as well as Father Deacon Jeff Martin for support regarding the current situation in Ukraine. I am grateful for spiritual support from Pope Francis, Bishop John Kendrick, Father Bob Stash, Father Vasil Bunik, Father Deacon Jeff Martin, and Matthew Matuszak at Ukrainian Catholic University for intentions and prayers for Ukraine. I am grateful to Frank Farley, Greg Feist , Bob Sternberg , Dean Simonton , and CP Snow for their inspiring and scientific encouragement that has had great impact and meaning in my academic path. I would also like to thank my creativity class for expressing keen interest regarding a lecture on Ukrainian artist Alexander Archipenko and the Ukrainian culture. Special gratitude to conversations with Father Deacon Jeff about identifying the problems and suggestions for rectifying the Ukraine Crisis and Alex Charyton for perseverance, interest and support with staying abreast of important fast-paced updates on Ukraine as well as Alex Charyton and the Charyton family for Ukrainian cultural influences and influences of valuing the power and legacy of Taras Shevchenko .

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Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Ohio State University Wexner Medical CenterColumbusUSA

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