Thinking Maps®: A Visual Language for Learning

  • David Hyerle
Chapter
Part of the Advanced Information and Knowledge Processing book series (AI&KP)

Abstract

There have been a range of different types of visual tools used in schools over the past 50 years such as “graphic organizers,” mind mapping, and concept mapping. These tools are grounded in the mapping metaphor, reflecting our capacities to network information and create cognitive maps of content knowledge and concepts. This writing investigates a language of eight cognitive maps called Thinking Maps® and Thinking Maps® Software, used from early grades through college courses to foster cognitive development and content learning across disciplines by all students across entire schools.

Keywords

Coherence Metaphor Gallatin 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag London 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • David Hyerle
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Thinking FoundationLymeUSA
  2. 2.Thinking Schools InternationalLymeUSA

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