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Emissions from Different Types of Combustors and Their Control

  • Jenny M. JonesEmail author
  • Amanda R. Lea-Langton
  • Lin Ma
  • Mohamed Pourkashanian
  • Alan Williams
Chapter
Part of the SpringerBriefs in Applied Sciences and Technology book series (BRIEFSAPPLSCIENCES)

Abstract

Emissions from different types of combustors and their control methods are outlined. These include emissions from fixed and travelling bed combustors and emissions from large industrial combustion plants. Emissions from wild Fires are also considered.

Keywords

Emission factors Bed combustors Pulverised fuel combustion 

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jenny M. Jones
    • 1
    Email author
  • Amanda R. Lea-Langton
    • 1
  • Lin Ma
    • 2
  • Mohamed Pourkashanian
    • 2
  • Alan Williams
    • 2
  1. 1.Energy Research InstituteUniversity of LeedsLeedsUK
  2. 2.Energy Technology and Innovation InitiativeUniversity of LeedsLeedsUK

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