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Life Threatening Tropical Infections

Chapter

Abstract

Infectious diseases are among the most common pediatric illnesses and are frequently encountered in the pediatric intensive care unit. Tropical infections, on the other hand, are relatively uncommon in children in developed countries, except those with pertinent travel histories or recent immigration. Clinicians who participate in mission work and disaster relief work also encounter these diseases as they are endemic in many developing nations. For the most part these infections do not result in critical illness however some do and this chapter will focus on a few of the more common infections with potential to be acutely life threatening. The epidemiology, pathophysiology, clinical manifestations, and current clinical management are presented for severe malaria, dengue fever, typhoid, and leptospirosis.

Keywords

Severe malaria Dengue fever Typhoid Leptospirosis Critical illness Pediatric 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag London 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Pediatric CardiologyUniversity of Alberta, Stollery Children’s HospitalEdmontonCanada
  2. 2.Department of Critical Care MedicineCincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical CenterCincinnatiUSA

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