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Managing Telehealth and Telecare

  • Kenneth J. TurnerEmail author
Chapter
Part of the Human–Computer Interaction Series book series (HCIS)

Abstract

This chapter expands on one theme of the overall book [65]: how to support flexible and automated management of care at home. This requires techniques that allow people to effectively interact with a home care system.

Keywords

Home Care Policy Language Social Care Policy Server Body Sensor Network 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Further Readings

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag London 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Computing Science and MathematicsUniversity of StirlingStirlingUK

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