Specialized Cancer Procedures and Surgery

  • John Thompson
  • Brendon J. Coventry
  • Douglas Tyler
  • Hidde M. Kroon
Chapter
Part of the Surgery: Complications, Risks and Consequences book series (SCRC)

Abstract

This chapter addresses the specialized surgical oncology procedures of isolated limb chemotherapy and retroperitoneal tumor dissection. Isolated limb infusion and perfusion chemotherapy procedures aim to deliver higher than systemic doses of chemotherapy regionally and selectively to the tumor-containing limb, for curative or palliative purposes. Retroperitoneal dissection is utilized for sarcoma and other malignancies and is often variable in nature depending on the tumor size, type, and location. This chapter aims to provide useful information on complications, risks, and consequences of ILI and ILP chemotherapy and retroperitoneal tumor surgery. For other associated procedures, refer to the relevant chapter and volume.

Keywords

Toxicity Catheter Ischemia Lymphoma Creatinine 

Further Reading, References, and Resources

Isolated Limb Infusion Chemotherapy

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Hyperthermic Isolated Limb Perfusion Surgery and Chemotherapy

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Retroperitoneal Tumour Surgery +/− Biopsy

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag London 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • John Thompson
    • 1
  • Brendon J. Coventry
    • 2
  • Douglas Tyler
    • 3
    • 4
  • Hidde M. Kroon
    • 5
  1. 1.Department of Surgery, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Melanoma InstituteThe University of SydneySydneyAustralia
  2. 2.Discipline of Surgery, Breast, Endocrine and Surgical Oncology Unit, Royal Adelaide HospitalUniversity of AdelaideAdelaideAustralia
  3. 3.Division of Surgical OncologyDuke University Medical CenterDurhamUSA
  4. 4.Department of SurgeryDuke University Medical CenterDurhamUSA
  5. 5.Sydney Melanoma Unit, Sydney Cancer Center, Royal Prince Alfred HospitalSydneyAustralia

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