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Comfort and Well-Being of Occupants

  • Giuliano Dall’O’
Chapter
Part of the Green Energy and Technology book series (GREEN)

Abstract

Indoor environmental quality depends on several variables: temperature, lighting, humidity, air quality and acoustics. A good indoor environmental quality requires integration of all these factors and of all ventilation, thermal, acoustic and illumination solutions. This chapter introduces basic aspects of comfort and well-being of the occupants, with the objective of demonstrating that an energy saving approach does not mean a reduction in comfort but, on the contrary, a guarantee of a better relationship between the occupants and their indoor environment.

Keywords

Thermal Comfort Radiant Temperature Luminous Intensity Luminous Flux HVAC System 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag London 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department Architecture, Built environment and Construction engineering (ABC)Politecnico di MilanoMilanItaly

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