Energy Conservation

  • Sara Booth
  • Julie Burkin
  • Catherine Moffat
  • Anna Spathis
Chapter

Abstract

There are few research studies to demonstrate the benefits of energy conservation specifically as a standalone intervention. It is often defined and researched as part of a multidimensional intervention programme, such as pulmonary rehabilitation, for which there is a large body of evidence to support effectiveness. Cognitive Behavioural Therapy also has some evidence to support its effectiveness in the management of breathlessness and reduction in emergency re-admissions for breathlessness patients. Much of the research refers to energy conservation or activity pacing within the context of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome or pain management, but this can be equally applied to the breathless patient, regardless of the cause. Booth et al. acknowledged that whilst energy conservation is frequently used in the management of breathlessness, definition and further research is required. However, energy conservation is an established component of most self-management programmes for breathlessness within the context of long term disease and evidence suggests that such programmes improve confidence to manage breathlessness and reduce hospital admissions.

Keywords

Fatigue Assure Caffeine 

References

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag London 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sara Booth
    • 1
  • Julie Burkin
    • 1
  • Catherine Moffat
    • 1
  • Anna Spathis
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Palliative CareCambridge University Hospitals NHS Foundation TrustCambridgeUK

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